Title

Table 1 [Drawing]

Presenting Author Name/s

Beth Lowney

Faculty Advisor

Elliott Jones, Alison Stinely

Presentation Type

Artwork

Disciplines

Art and Design | Illustration

Description/Abstract

Artist Statement

The title, Table 1, shows a mother nursing her infant in public at a restaurant. The title could reference how a business will number tables. Restaurants may worry about whether their other guests will feel offended by the sight of a nursing mother. Some restaurants ask mothers to move to another table or leave. It is a misdemeanor to ask a breastfeeding mother to move, cover up or leave a place of business where she is otherwise legally allowed to be present.

Below the image of the mother is a copy of Table 1 from the US Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding, 2011. This table lists Excess Health Risks Associated with Not Breastfeeding. This data is obscured from the viewer to represent how the public remains ignorant of facts about breastfeeding. If the public knew these health risks, would it make a difference in how we review breastfeeding in public?

The second panel for Table 1 shows an empty plate on the table in front of the infant. The table and plate contain subtle images of money. Surrounding the frames are free samples and coupons for infant formula. The aggressive marketing of infant formula encourages mothers to switch from breastmilk to formula without disclosing the facts about the excess risks of not breastfeeding from Table 1. If women knew about the lifelong health risks for infants who were not breast fed, would they still make the same choice?

Session Title

Art Exhibit

Location

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Art Gallery

Start Date

2-2-2019 8:00 AM

End Date

2-2-2019 12:30 PM

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Feb 2nd, 8:00 AM Feb 2nd, 12:30 PM

Table 1 [Drawing]

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Art Gallery

Artist Statement

The title, Table 1, shows a mother nursing her infant in public at a restaurant. The title could reference how a business will number tables. Restaurants may worry about whether their other guests will feel offended by the sight of a nursing mother. Some restaurants ask mothers to move to another table or leave. It is a misdemeanor to ask a breastfeeding mother to move, cover up or leave a place of business where she is otherwise legally allowed to be present.

Below the image of the mother is a copy of Table 1 from the US Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding, 2011. This table lists Excess Health Risks Associated with Not Breastfeeding. This data is obscured from the viewer to represent how the public remains ignorant of facts about breastfeeding. If the public knew these health risks, would it make a difference in how we review breastfeeding in public?

The second panel for Table 1 shows an empty plate on the table in front of the infant. The table and plate contain subtle images of money. Surrounding the frames are free samples and coupons for infant formula. The aggressive marketing of infant formula encourages mothers to switch from breastmilk to formula without disclosing the facts about the excess risks of not breastfeeding from Table 1. If women knew about the lifelong health risks for infants who were not breast fed, would they still make the same choice?