Title

Control [Sculpture]

Presenting Author Name/s

Krissie Moore

Faculty Advisor

John Roth

Presentation Type

Artwork

Disciplines

Sculpture

Description/Abstract

Artist Statement

“Control”

Today, both men and women suffer inequalities depending on their various status quos. However, we cannot distract from the fact that women have had small say throughout much of history. It continues to unnerve me that aside from women making strides in politics and business, we are still denied control over our own bodies and undermined in our abilities. Feminist art continues to rise; some strongly representational, some abstracted. I find ways to balance abstraction and representation through my material so that it can bring light to my subject without distorting its own physical characteristics. Keeping the natural properties of the medium is important to the rawness of the concepts. The main wood frame of the sculpture is African mahogany and was chosen for the red hue to represent a womb. The inner piece is Douglas fir to stand alone as a phallic or fetal figure and was chosen to contrast the red hue of the outer layer. The copper represents the cage and tension of the obstruction from what is ours (as women) to control. Copper tubing was the best option to keep each representational line straight for a cage-like effect. The finish is intentional to allow the wood to speak for its natural self. The shape of the wood was both an additive and reductive process. Due to the height and width, there was varied trial and error in order to carve, cut, and shape the curvature. This piece was my own opinionated statement with open conceptualization. A major influence for this piece came from Barbara Hepworth’s sculptures. My intention to the audience is to perceive it in their own way, agree or disagree with the concept, and find room to open their minds to different ideas. Whether the conversation that strikes comes from a negative or positive perspective, my work has completed its purpose by evoking a feeling which is necessary for us to continue to practice equality.

Session Title

Art Exhibit

Location

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Art Gallery

Start Date

2-2-2019 8:00 AM

End Date

2-2-2019 12:30 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Feb 2nd, 8:00 AM Feb 2nd, 12:30 PM

Control [Sculpture]

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Art Gallery

Artist Statement

“Control”

Today, both men and women suffer inequalities depending on their various status quos. However, we cannot distract from the fact that women have had small say throughout much of history. It continues to unnerve me that aside from women making strides in politics and business, we are still denied control over our own bodies and undermined in our abilities. Feminist art continues to rise; some strongly representational, some abstracted. I find ways to balance abstraction and representation through my material so that it can bring light to my subject without distorting its own physical characteristics. Keeping the natural properties of the medium is important to the rawness of the concepts. The main wood frame of the sculpture is African mahogany and was chosen for the red hue to represent a womb. The inner piece is Douglas fir to stand alone as a phallic or fetal figure and was chosen to contrast the red hue of the outer layer. The copper represents the cage and tension of the obstruction from what is ours (as women) to control. Copper tubing was the best option to keep each representational line straight for a cage-like effect. The finish is intentional to allow the wood to speak for its natural self. The shape of the wood was both an additive and reductive process. Due to the height and width, there was varied trial and error in order to carve, cut, and shape the curvature. This piece was my own opinionated statement with open conceptualization. A major influence for this piece came from Barbara Hepworth’s sculptures. My intention to the audience is to perceive it in their own way, agree or disagree with the concept, and find room to open their minds to different ideas. Whether the conversation that strikes comes from a negative or positive perspective, my work has completed its purpose by evoking a feeling which is necessary for us to continue to practice equality.