Title

Hosting Triathlons on a College Campus: Perceived Health Outcomes and Satisfaction

Presenting Author Name/s

Taylor McIntosh

Faculty Advisor

Eddie Hill

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Disciplines

Psychology | Social and Behavioral Sciences | Sports Studies

Description/Abstract

Regardless of their tremendous growth (USA Triathlon, 2014), emerging lifestyle sports such as triathlons have received very little research attention. The Perceived Health Outcomes of Recreation Scale (PHORS) is theoretically grounded in Driver’s (1998) benefits of leisure. The Means-end of Recreation Scale (MERS) reflected Gutman’s (1982) means-end theory. The scales have been used in previous research on National Scenic Trails, rock climbing, and mountain biking. The current study examined the health outcomes, values, and satisfaction among participants in a college campus triathlon. This was the sixth year for this event; it is a “super sprint” triathlon including a 400-yard pool swim, a six mile bike around the campus, and a 5k run through campus. Participants completed the 26-item PHORS and Means-end of MERS online via Qualtrics. Of the 98 participants, 55 completed the survey. The sample was 57% male; 58% Married; 90% Caucasian; 33% had served Active Duty Military; and 80% employed full-time. Eighty-four percent participants indicated this event contributed to a healthy lifestyle, 84% said they would recommend this event, and 78% indicated they would do this event again. Many participants from the 2017 pilot study indicated their motivation for participation was that included their entire family. As multisport continue to grow and our society embraces health and wellness as a lifestyle, triathlon has the ability to create significant positive benefits for our youth and adults.

Session Title

Communication & Literature

Location

Learning Commons @ Perry Library Conference Room 1311

Start Date

2-2-2019 10:15 AM

End Date

2-2-2019 11:15 AM

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Feb 2nd, 10:15 AM Feb 2nd, 11:15 AM

Hosting Triathlons on a College Campus: Perceived Health Outcomes and Satisfaction

Learning Commons @ Perry Library Conference Room 1311

Regardless of their tremendous growth (USA Triathlon, 2014), emerging lifestyle sports such as triathlons have received very little research attention. The Perceived Health Outcomes of Recreation Scale (PHORS) is theoretically grounded in Driver’s (1998) benefits of leisure. The Means-end of Recreation Scale (MERS) reflected Gutman’s (1982) means-end theory. The scales have been used in previous research on National Scenic Trails, rock climbing, and mountain biking. The current study examined the health outcomes, values, and satisfaction among participants in a college campus triathlon. This was the sixth year for this event; it is a “super sprint” triathlon including a 400-yard pool swim, a six mile bike around the campus, and a 5k run through campus. Participants completed the 26-item PHORS and Means-end of MERS online via Qualtrics. Of the 98 participants, 55 completed the survey. The sample was 57% male; 58% Married; 90% Caucasian; 33% had served Active Duty Military; and 80% employed full-time. Eighty-four percent participants indicated this event contributed to a healthy lifestyle, 84% said they would recommend this event, and 78% indicated they would do this event again. Many participants from the 2017 pilot study indicated their motivation for participation was that included their entire family. As multisport continue to grow and our society embraces health and wellness as a lifestyle, triathlon has the ability to create significant positive benefits for our youth and adults.