Title

Norfolk's Gay Information Hotline: Uncovering a Hidden Milestone in the LGBTQ+ Community

Presenting Author Name/s

Aiyana Roll

Faculty Advisor

Cathleen Rhodes

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Disciplines

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies | Women's Studies

Description/Abstract

This presentation will explore the research methods used in examining the importance of Norfolk’s Gay Information Line, a hotline that operated throughout the 1980s and 90s, as part of The Queer Walking Tour of Norfolk, an academic/community effort to uncover and preserve local queer history. Much of the information gathered for this project was found through archival research of Our Own Community Press, Norfolk's gay newspaper from 1976 to 1998. The Gay Information Line was a direct and primary source of LGBTQ+ information during its time, and is a vital piece of local LGBT history. Very little information is available to the public about the hotline; therefore, there is a lack of knowledge about the subject or analysis of its role in the community. This presentation will discuss research methods and the process of uncovering information about the hotline and will explore the importance of archival research, personal interviews and testimonies, and the role that research plays in recognizing marginalized histories.

Session Title

LGBTQA

Location

Learning Commons @ Perry Library Conference Room 1311

Start Date

2-2-2019 11:30 AM

End Date

2-2-2019 12:30 PM

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Feb 2nd, 11:30 AM Feb 2nd, 12:30 PM

Norfolk's Gay Information Hotline: Uncovering a Hidden Milestone in the LGBTQ+ Community

Learning Commons @ Perry Library Conference Room 1311

This presentation will explore the research methods used in examining the importance of Norfolk’s Gay Information Line, a hotline that operated throughout the 1980s and 90s, as part of The Queer Walking Tour of Norfolk, an academic/community effort to uncover and preserve local queer history. Much of the information gathered for this project was found through archival research of Our Own Community Press, Norfolk's gay newspaper from 1976 to 1998. The Gay Information Line was a direct and primary source of LGBTQ+ information during its time, and is a vital piece of local LGBT history. Very little information is available to the public about the hotline; therefore, there is a lack of knowledge about the subject or analysis of its role in the community. This presentation will discuss research methods and the process of uncovering information about the hotline and will explore the importance of archival research, personal interviews and testimonies, and the role that research plays in recognizing marginalized histories.