Title

High-Force Magnetic Pulling Cytometer for Probing Cellular Mechanotransduction Pathways

Presenting Author Name/s

Joshua Bush

Faculty Advisor

Venkat Maruthamuthu

Presentation Type

Poster

Disciplines

Biomechanical Engineering | Molecular, Cellular, and Tissue Engineering

Description/Abstract

Cellular domains accrue mechanical fluctuations as a means of communication. The process by which these mechanical forces are transmitted into cellular signals is termed, mechanotransduction. To explore these mechanotransduction pathways we developed a magnetic pulling cytometer for applying localized exogenous forces to a target receptor. We coated a micron-sized superparamagnetic bead such that it will bind to the cell’s integrins, the primary receptors responsible for cell adhesion to an extracellular matrix. Using the magnetic pulling cytometer a physiologically relevant force on the order of a few nanonewtons was applied to the bead and thus the cell. In order to determine the forces applied to the cell in situ, we utilized traction force microscopy. Cellular responses to the applied force such as the distribution of forces across the cell and changes in the cytoskeletal network or focal adhesions may now be probed further.

Session Title

Poster Session

Location

Learning Commons, Northwest Atrium

Start Date

2-2-2019 8:00 AM

End Date

2-2-2019 12:30 PM

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Feb 2nd, 8:00 AM Feb 2nd, 12:30 PM

High-Force Magnetic Pulling Cytometer for Probing Cellular Mechanotransduction Pathways

Learning Commons, Northwest Atrium

Cellular domains accrue mechanical fluctuations as a means of communication. The process by which these mechanical forces are transmitted into cellular signals is termed, mechanotransduction. To explore these mechanotransduction pathways we developed a magnetic pulling cytometer for applying localized exogenous forces to a target receptor. We coated a micron-sized superparamagnetic bead such that it will bind to the cell’s integrins, the primary receptors responsible for cell adhesion to an extracellular matrix. Using the magnetic pulling cytometer a physiologically relevant force on the order of a few nanonewtons was applied to the bead and thus the cell. In order to determine the forces applied to the cell in situ, we utilized traction force microscopy. Cellular responses to the applied force such as the distribution of forces across the cell and changes in the cytoskeletal network or focal adhesions may now be probed further.