Title

Aging Study through Fin Regeneration in Zebrafish

Presenting Author Name/s

Ashley N. Coffell, Andriana C. Zourou, Regan M. Allen

Faculty Advisor

Dr. X. Nancy Xu

Presentation Type

Poster

Disciplines

Biochemistry | Biology | Developmental Biology | Genetics

Description/Abstract

Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are an emerging model for studying human aging. Zebrafish share similar senescence patterns and many homologous genes with humans. They also have extensive regeneration capacities, such as the ability to repair heart tissue and regrow entire fins. Their shared biological traits and the capacity for tissue regeneration lend promise to future biomedical research. Yet, as a novel model for gerontology, a better understanding of the relationship between Zebrafish age and the human age equivalent is needed. Zebrafish live a maximum of 66 months, but rarely make it to that age. Using the tMax formula, it may be estimated that one zebrafish year is approximately equivalent to 22 human years. This calculation is supported by anecdotal and observed evidence, however a more substantial correlation is needed. We have studied age-dependent regeneration capabilities of zebrafish by amputation of the caudal fin (tail fin) in different age groups of zebrafish and observation of the rate at which it fully regenerates. We aim to more firmly establish the major life stages of the Zebrafish and understand their unique regeneration capabilities. We will further our research to study the roles which blastema cells play in fin regeneration as well as to find genes and gene products responsible for the changes in regeneration rates and seek out human counterparts to these to design regenerative medicine.

Session Title

Poster Session

Location

Learning Commons, Northwest Atrium

Start Date

2-2-2019 8:00 AM

End Date

2-2-2019 12:30 PM

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Feb 2nd, 8:00 AM Feb 2nd, 12:30 PM

Aging Study through Fin Regeneration in Zebrafish

Learning Commons, Northwest Atrium

Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are an emerging model for studying human aging. Zebrafish share similar senescence patterns and many homologous genes with humans. They also have extensive regeneration capacities, such as the ability to repair heart tissue and regrow entire fins. Their shared biological traits and the capacity for tissue regeneration lend promise to future biomedical research. Yet, as a novel model for gerontology, a better understanding of the relationship between Zebrafish age and the human age equivalent is needed. Zebrafish live a maximum of 66 months, but rarely make it to that age. Using the tMax formula, it may be estimated that one zebrafish year is approximately equivalent to 22 human years. This calculation is supported by anecdotal and observed evidence, however a more substantial correlation is needed. We have studied age-dependent regeneration capabilities of zebrafish by amputation of the caudal fin (tail fin) in different age groups of zebrafish and observation of the rate at which it fully regenerates. We aim to more firmly establish the major life stages of the Zebrafish and understand their unique regeneration capabilities. We will further our research to study the roles which blastema cells play in fin regeneration as well as to find genes and gene products responsible for the changes in regeneration rates and seek out human counterparts to these to design regenerative medicine.