Title

Love and Landscapes: Titian’s Sacred and Profane Love, as a Lesson for the Bride

Description/Abstract

Titian painted the mystifying Sacred and Profane Love in 1514 and its intended message is still disputed among scholars. The controversy primarily lies in the question of whether the two frontal subjects in the painting represent twin Venus’ as conceptualized by Plato or if the scene depicts a “lesson for the bride” scenario with the bride, Laura Bagarotto, on the left and Venus on the right. Despite establishing the women as twin Venuses, the intended message remains inconclusive until thorough analyzation of the iconographical clues dispersed throughout the painting is conducted. This paper seeks to disclose the intended meaning of the painting by making connections in the artist’s early works through the reoccurring buildings in the landscapes that he adopted from his friend and mentor, Giorgione. This landscape motif was established during Titian’s completion of Giorgione’s Sleeping Venus with its final debut emerging in Sacred and Profane Love to represent the artist’s ultimate separation from his mentor whilst simultaneously communicating a message of faith and love within the marital painting.

Presenting Author Name/s

Ireland O'Hare

Faculty Advisor

Anne Muraoka

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Disciplines

Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Session Title

College of Arts & Letters 3

Location

Learning Commons @ Perry Library Room 1306

Start Date

2-8-2020 10:15 AM

End Date

2-8-2020 11:15 AM

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Feb 8th, 10:15 AM Feb 8th, 11:15 AM

Love and Landscapes: Titian’s Sacred and Profane Love, as a Lesson for the Bride

Learning Commons @ Perry Library Room 1306

Titian painted the mystifying Sacred and Profane Love in 1514 and its intended message is still disputed among scholars. The controversy primarily lies in the question of whether the two frontal subjects in the painting represent twin Venus’ as conceptualized by Plato or if the scene depicts a “lesson for the bride” scenario with the bride, Laura Bagarotto, on the left and Venus on the right. Despite establishing the women as twin Venuses, the intended message remains inconclusive until thorough analyzation of the iconographical clues dispersed throughout the painting is conducted. This paper seeks to disclose the intended meaning of the painting by making connections in the artist’s early works through the reoccurring buildings in the landscapes that he adopted from his friend and mentor, Giorgione. This landscape motif was established during Titian’s completion of Giorgione’s Sleeping Venus with its final debut emerging in Sacred and Profane Love to represent the artist’s ultimate separation from his mentor whilst simultaneously communicating a message of faith and love within the marital painting.