Title

Factors that Influence City Micro-mobility: An Understanding of Campus E-Scooter Use

Description/Abstract

This study explored the key factors that affected the use of shared electronic scooters (e-scooters, a form of city micro-mobility) as well as users’ awareness of any potential privacy issues with e-scooters, using the Lime scooters on ODU campus as a testbed. We recruited 12 frequent e-scooter users from ODU campus for semi-structured interviews designed to understand the users’ motivations and concerns. Our results suggest that students’ primary purposes for utilizing the e-scooters fall under the categories of convenience and entertainment. In terms of the users’ privacy concerns, our results show that they are largely unaware of the privacy terms used by the mobile application that is required to use the e-scooters, and users especially lack the knowledge of data gathering by the application and the many ways data can be used. As participants became more knowledgeable of the capturing of their data, they demonstrated more privacy concerns during the interview. This research only contained results from a small sample of ODU students, and future research should be devoted to the generalization of the current results and solutions to increase users’ privacy awareness.

Presenting Author Name/s

Qwe'Vontae Eure

Faculty Advisor

Jing Chen

Presentation Type

Poster

Disciplines

Human Factors Psychology

Session Title

Poster Session

Location

Learning Commons, Atrium

Start Date

2-8-2020 8:00 AM

End Date

2-8-2020 12:30 PM

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Feb 8th, 8:00 AM Feb 8th, 12:30 PM

Factors that Influence City Micro-mobility: An Understanding of Campus E-Scooter Use

Learning Commons, Atrium

This study explored the key factors that affected the use of shared electronic scooters (e-scooters, a form of city micro-mobility) as well as users’ awareness of any potential privacy issues with e-scooters, using the Lime scooters on ODU campus as a testbed. We recruited 12 frequent e-scooter users from ODU campus for semi-structured interviews designed to understand the users’ motivations and concerns. Our results suggest that students’ primary purposes for utilizing the e-scooters fall under the categories of convenience and entertainment. In terms of the users’ privacy concerns, our results show that they are largely unaware of the privacy terms used by the mobile application that is required to use the e-scooters, and users especially lack the knowledge of data gathering by the application and the many ways data can be used. As participants became more knowledgeable of the capturing of their data, they demonstrated more privacy concerns during the interview. This research only contained results from a small sample of ODU students, and future research should be devoted to the generalization of the current results and solutions to increase users’ privacy awareness.