Title

Ticks From Veterinary Perspective

Description/Abstract

Ticks and tick borne pathogens have always been a threat to domestic animals and pets. Traditionally ticks have been collected through vegetation sampling and from wildlife hosts. The ODU Tick Team has been conducting active surveillance since 2009. In the summer of 2019, we looked to supplement this process by asking veterinarians to contribute ticks to our research. To that end, we visited 29 veterinarian clinics in the Hampton Roads area and provided them with basic information on ticks found in our region and where to find ticks on animals they see in their clinic. We asked those who were willing to participate to notify us when they had ticks for pickup. The clinics were visited from June to August, and of those, six clinics contacted us for pickup. In conclusion, this study highlights the challenges of engaging busy veterinary practices in research. However, this study did provide an opportunity for spreading tick awareness specific to the Hampton Roads region.

Presenting Author Name/s

Gelencia Knight

Faculty Advisor

Holly Gaff

Presentation Type

Poster

Disciplines

Biology

Session Title

Poster Session

Location

Learning Commons, Atrium

Start Date

2-8-2020 8:00 AM

End Date

2-8-2020 12:30 PM

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Feb 8th, 8:00 AM Feb 8th, 12:30 PM

Ticks From Veterinary Perspective

Learning Commons, Atrium

Ticks and tick borne pathogens have always been a threat to domestic animals and pets. Traditionally ticks have been collected through vegetation sampling and from wildlife hosts. The ODU Tick Team has been conducting active surveillance since 2009. In the summer of 2019, we looked to supplement this process by asking veterinarians to contribute ticks to our research. To that end, we visited 29 veterinarian clinics in the Hampton Roads area and provided them with basic information on ticks found in our region and where to find ticks on animals they see in their clinic. We asked those who were willing to participate to notify us when they had ticks for pickup. The clinics were visited from June to August, and of those, six clinics contacted us for pickup. In conclusion, this study highlights the challenges of engaging busy veterinary practices in research. However, this study did provide an opportunity for spreading tick awareness specific to the Hampton Roads region.