Title

Exploring Economic and Occupational Correlates of American Adult Anxiety Levels From 2010 - 2018

Description/Abstract

Recent trends show that levels of anxiety have been increasing in Americans the past few years (American Psychiatric Association, 2018). In this project, we explored economic and occupational reasons that may explain this increase, such as wage stagnation, a rapid increase in information availability, and changes in work culture. Using data from 2010-2018, this research presents how trends of anxiety have changed and what causes those trends. Findings show an unexpected trend in “feelings of anxiousness, worry, or nervousness”, with the most fluctuation in the response “weekly” out of the choices daily, weekly, or monthly. Surprisingly, we also discovered a flat trend line in some responses, as opposed to our initial assumption that the data would show a positive linear trend line. Future research, including ongoing interviews with employees about how work stress is evolving in the modern world, are discussed.

Presenting Author Name/s

Lauren Norquist, Phil Yorkman, and Andrew Bennet

Faculty Advisor

Andrew Bennet

Presentation Type

Poster

Disciplines

Laboratory and Basic Science Research | Organizational Behavior and Theory | Other Business | Other Psychology

Session Title

Poster Session

Location

Learning Commons, Atrium

Start Date

2-8-2020 8:00 AM

End Date

2-8-2020 12:30 PM

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Feb 8th, 8:00 AM Feb 8th, 12:30 PM

Exploring Economic and Occupational Correlates of American Adult Anxiety Levels From 2010 - 2018

Learning Commons, Atrium

Recent trends show that levels of anxiety have been increasing in Americans the past few years (American Psychiatric Association, 2018). In this project, we explored economic and occupational reasons that may explain this increase, such as wage stagnation, a rapid increase in information availability, and changes in work culture. Using data from 2010-2018, this research presents how trends of anxiety have changed and what causes those trends. Findings show an unexpected trend in “feelings of anxiousness, worry, or nervousness”, with the most fluctuation in the response “weekly” out of the choices daily, weekly, or monthly. Surprisingly, we also discovered a flat trend line in some responses, as opposed to our initial assumption that the data would show a positive linear trend line. Future research, including ongoing interviews with employees about how work stress is evolving in the modern world, are discussed.