Title

Electrons for Neutrinos: Lepton Energy Reconstruction in the Resonance Excitation Region

Description/Abstract

A major area of research in nuclear/particle physics is the understanding of neutrino oscillations. The probability of measuring neutrinos to be in a particular state oscillates as they travel through space, and neutrino beam experiments are currently being run in an attempt to describe the nature of these oscillations. Neutrino beams cover a wide energy range, therefore a major obstacle for interpreting the results of these experiments is the determination of the incident neutrino energy. By using electron data with a known beam energy from the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and exploiting the leptonic similarities between electrons and neutrinos, we tested various techniques for determining the energies of incident leptons. We found that for events with only one electron, one proton, and one pion we could accurately reconstruct the energy only for negative pions. We were also only successful if we used information from all three particles. We will present data from various targets at beam energies of 2.2 and 4.4 GeV.

Presenting Author Name/s

Lucas Tracy

Faculty Advisor

Lawrence Weinstein

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Disciplines

Nuclear

Session Title

College of Sciences 2

Location

Learning Commons @ Perry Library Conference Room 1310

Start Date

2-8-2020 10:15 AM

End Date

2-8-2020 11:15 AM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Feb 8th, 10:15 AM Feb 8th, 11:15 AM

Electrons for Neutrinos: Lepton Energy Reconstruction in the Resonance Excitation Region

Learning Commons @ Perry Library Conference Room 1310

A major area of research in nuclear/particle physics is the understanding of neutrino oscillations. The probability of measuring neutrinos to be in a particular state oscillates as they travel through space, and neutrino beam experiments are currently being run in an attempt to describe the nature of these oscillations. Neutrino beams cover a wide energy range, therefore a major obstacle for interpreting the results of these experiments is the determination of the incident neutrino energy. By using electron data with a known beam energy from the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and exploiting the leptonic similarities between electrons and neutrinos, we tested various techniques for determining the energies of incident leptons. We found that for events with only one electron, one proton, and one pion we could accurately reconstruct the energy only for negative pions. We were also only successful if we used information from all three particles. We will present data from various targets at beam energies of 2.2 and 4.4 GeV.