Title

Procedure and Effects of Five Supplements on Asymbiotic Germination of Platanthera dilatata

Description/Abstract/Artist Statement

Members of family Orchidaceae, or orchids, grow in the wild with the help of a symbiotic mycorrhizal fungus. When grown in vitro, the mycorrhizal element is often removed, and the seeds are germinated within a gel growth medium which provides the nutrients needed for germination. This method is often referred to as “asymbiotic germination”, and it has become an important tool for the conservation of orchids, due to its simplicity and genetic benefits. It is crucial especially to maintaining a larger genetic base for a species. This experiment seeks to determine the best procedure and growth medium for asymbiotic germination of Platanthera dilatata, a terrestrial and temperate orchid native to North America. Tests are being run to determine the efficacy of five additives to the growth medium for maximum germination. These additives are coconut water, banana powder, peptone from soymeal, and two amino acids- arginine and tyrosine. Banana powder and coconut water are both well established as efficient supplements for the germination of many orchid species, but the specific efficiency varies by species, and what works for one species may be detrimental to another. Peptone, arginine and tyrosine are less well known as supplements for germination but have been used in some literature and require further testing. If success is found in germinating seeds from Platanthera dilatata, the experiment will expand to include other species available from the Kaplan Orchid Conservatory.

Presenting Author Name/s

Noah Tait

Faculty Advisor/Mentor

Lisa Wallace

College Affiliation

College of Sciences

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Disciplines

Botany | Laboratory and Basic Science Research

Session Title

Interdisciplinary Research #4

Location

Zoom Room V

Start Date

3-20-2021 12:00 PM

End Date

3-20-2021 12:55 PM

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Mar 20th, 12:00 PM Mar 20th, 12:55 PM

Procedure and Effects of Five Supplements on Asymbiotic Germination of Platanthera dilatata

Zoom Room V

Members of family Orchidaceae, or orchids, grow in the wild with the help of a symbiotic mycorrhizal fungus. When grown in vitro, the mycorrhizal element is often removed, and the seeds are germinated within a gel growth medium which provides the nutrients needed for germination. This method is often referred to as “asymbiotic germination”, and it has become an important tool for the conservation of orchids, due to its simplicity and genetic benefits. It is crucial especially to maintaining a larger genetic base for a species. This experiment seeks to determine the best procedure and growth medium for asymbiotic germination of Platanthera dilatata, a terrestrial and temperate orchid native to North America. Tests are being run to determine the efficacy of five additives to the growth medium for maximum germination. These additives are coconut water, banana powder, peptone from soymeal, and two amino acids- arginine and tyrosine. Banana powder and coconut water are both well established as efficient supplements for the germination of many orchid species, but the specific efficiency varies by species, and what works for one species may be detrimental to another. Peptone, arginine and tyrosine are less well known as supplements for germination but have been used in some literature and require further testing. If success is found in germinating seeds from Platanthera dilatata, the experiment will expand to include other species available from the Kaplan Orchid Conservatory.