Title

Commodities: Invasive and Precious

Comments

Click on thumbnails to see full-size version in the Art Gallery:

Description/Abstract/Artist Statement

My work is often autobiographical and inspired by nature’s ability to reclaim and erode. I find beauty in the imperfections of salvaged materials and enjoy breathing new life into discarded objects. Through the dichotomies of order and chaos, light and shadow, ephemeral and enduring, I explore my past experiences and hopes for the future. My work in metals explores the ephemeral nature of life and natural resources. My piece, Precious Commodity, speaks to the weight of parenthood and the impact our current rate of resource consumption will have on the future my children inherit. My sculpture, Novel Hypocrisy, was inspired by a bamboo forest on the path behind my home. It is an invasive species that doesn’t belong here, and I can relate to that. After serving in the Air Force for eight years and following my husband while he completed his military career, I found myself planted in many places where I felt displaced and a few where I questioned if I was a part of something invasive. I hope my works inspire a moment of reflection and introspection as the viewer considers their impact on the natural world around them.

Presenting Author Name/s

Sarah Thompson

Faculty Advisor/Mentor

Jonn Roth, Emily Culver

College Affiliation

College of Arts & Letters

Presentation Type

Artwork

Disciplines

Metal and Jewelry Arts | Sculpture

Session Title

Art Exhibit

Location

Learning Commons @ Perry Library

Start Date

3-19-2022 9:15 AM

End Date

3-19-2022 11:00 AM

Upload File

wf_no

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 19th, 9:15 AM Mar 19th, 11:00 AM

Commodities: Invasive and Precious

Learning Commons @ Perry Library

My work is often autobiographical and inspired by nature’s ability to reclaim and erode. I find beauty in the imperfections of salvaged materials and enjoy breathing new life into discarded objects. Through the dichotomies of order and chaos, light and shadow, ephemeral and enduring, I explore my past experiences and hopes for the future. My work in metals explores the ephemeral nature of life and natural resources. My piece, Precious Commodity, speaks to the weight of parenthood and the impact our current rate of resource consumption will have on the future my children inherit. My sculpture, Novel Hypocrisy, was inspired by a bamboo forest on the path behind my home. It is an invasive species that doesn’t belong here, and I can relate to that. After serving in the Air Force for eight years and following my husband while he completed his military career, I found myself planted in many places where I felt displaced and a few where I questioned if I was a part of something invasive. I hope my works inspire a moment of reflection and introspection as the viewer considers their impact on the natural world around them.