Title

The Impact of Lactation on Resting Metabolic Rate

Description/Abstract/Artist Statement

Introduction: Studies demonstrate that breastfeeding women have higher resting metabolic rates (RMR) compared to women who are not breastfeeding. However, whether a single bout of lactation increases RMR is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if a single bout of lactation acutely increased RMR.

Methods: 17 lactating women (Age: 32±0.86, BMI: 28.7±1.8) were recruited into the study. RMR was assessed at baseline and at 1 hour and 2 hours following breast milk expression. Further, 14 non-lactating women (Age: 26±1.79, BMI: 26.5±1.6) served as time controls with RMR measured at baseline, and following 1 and 2 hours of sitting.

Results: RMR was unchanged following a single bout of lactation (Lactating Women: Baseline: 1409 ± 48; 1hr: 1399 ± 71; 2hr: 1407 ± 38 kcals/day) (p>0.05). Additionally, there was no statistically significant group or time effect of RMR in the lactating and non-lactating women (Non-Lactating women: Baseline: 1410 ± 55; 1hr: 1438 ± 46; 2hr: 1441 ± 48 kcals/day) (p>0.05). Interestingly, RMR was not significantly correlated to the average amount of milk produced per day (r=-0.03, p>0.05) or the number of times each day breast milk was expressed (r=-0.05, p>0.05). However, RMR was significantly, positively correlated to body mass (r=0.78, p

Presenting Author Name/s

Da'Zha Loney

Faculty Advisor/Mentor

Leryn Reynolds, Patrick Wilson

College Affiliation

College of Education & Professional Studies (Darden)

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Disciplines

Medical Sciences | Medical Specialties

Session Title

College of Education UG Research #1

Location

Zoom

Start Date

3-19-2022 1:00 PM

End Date

3-19-2022 2:00 PM

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Mar 19th, 1:00 PM Mar 19th, 2:00 PM

The Impact of Lactation on Resting Metabolic Rate

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Introduction: Studies demonstrate that breastfeeding women have higher resting metabolic rates (RMR) compared to women who are not breastfeeding. However, whether a single bout of lactation increases RMR is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if a single bout of lactation acutely increased RMR.

Methods: 17 lactating women (Age: 32±0.86, BMI: 28.7±1.8) were recruited into the study. RMR was assessed at baseline and at 1 hour and 2 hours following breast milk expression. Further, 14 non-lactating women (Age: 26±1.79, BMI: 26.5±1.6) served as time controls with RMR measured at baseline, and following 1 and 2 hours of sitting.

Results: RMR was unchanged following a single bout of lactation (Lactating Women: Baseline: 1409 ± 48; 1hr: 1399 ± 71; 2hr: 1407 ± 38 kcals/day) (p>0.05). Additionally, there was no statistically significant group or time effect of RMR in the lactating and non-lactating women (Non-Lactating women: Baseline: 1410 ± 55; 1hr: 1438 ± 46; 2hr: 1441 ± 48 kcals/day) (p>0.05). Interestingly, RMR was not significantly correlated to the average amount of milk produced per day (r=-0.03, p>0.05) or the number of times each day breast milk was expressed (r=-0.05, p>0.05). However, RMR was significantly, positively correlated to body mass (r=0.78, p