Title

Asymbiotic Seed Germination of Native Virginia Orchid Tipularia discolor

Description/Abstract/Artist Statement

Tipularia discolor, commonly referred to as crippled cranefly, is a perennial terrestrial orchid found across the eastern coast of the United States. Characterized by its purple-spotted leaves and plain, crane fly-like flowers, T. discolor has slowly started to disappear from its native woods. Speculation around the decline of T. discolor generates the same insights gained from the reputation of orchids and their specificity on locale and the vital relationship with its mycorrhizal partners. Currently, there are no published methodologies which explore T. discolor seed germination, likely due to the complexity of its requirements. The purpose of this study is to develop methods of asymbiotic germination and to test variable levels of ammonium nitrate, which may give insight to the little-known nature of germination in T. discolor. Our initial tests indicate that T. discolor seeds can be germinated asymbiotically, and the results of these additional experiments will be presented. Understanding how botanists and ecologists can protect fragile orchid populations in light of human disturbance and human-accelerated climate change is instrumental to the reintroduction of orchids to their native habitats and survival of this plant family.

Presenting Author Name/s

Alexis Hungerford

Faculty Advisor/Mentor

Lisa Wallace

College Affiliation

College of Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster

Disciplines

Biology | Botany | Plant Biology

Session Title

Poster Session

Location

Learning Commons @ Perry Library

Start Date

3-19-2022 9:00 AM

End Date

3-19-2022 11:00 AM

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Mar 19th, 9:00 AM Mar 19th, 11:00 AM

Asymbiotic Seed Germination of Native Virginia Orchid Tipularia discolor

Learning Commons @ Perry Library

Tipularia discolor, commonly referred to as crippled cranefly, is a perennial terrestrial orchid found across the eastern coast of the United States. Characterized by its purple-spotted leaves and plain, crane fly-like flowers, T. discolor has slowly started to disappear from its native woods. Speculation around the decline of T. discolor generates the same insights gained from the reputation of orchids and their specificity on locale and the vital relationship with its mycorrhizal partners. Currently, there are no published methodologies which explore T. discolor seed germination, likely due to the complexity of its requirements. The purpose of this study is to develop methods of asymbiotic germination and to test variable levels of ammonium nitrate, which may give insight to the little-known nature of germination in T. discolor. Our initial tests indicate that T. discolor seeds can be germinated asymbiotically, and the results of these additional experiments will be presented. Understanding how botanists and ecologists can protect fragile orchid populations in light of human disturbance and human-accelerated climate change is instrumental to the reintroduction of orchids to their native habitats and survival of this plant family.