Title

Climate Change in the Arctic: What Everyone Should Know About the Arctic in Our World Today

Description/Abstract/Artist Statement

Recent years show unprecedented change in the ice-covered Arctic Ocean, however, many peoples’ understanding of this system is limited. OES 395 is a topics course called Arctic Climate Change and aims to provide an introduction to Arctic science, how the Arctic is changing and the impact those changes may have on us. Through traditional lectures, and hands-on data analysis, students will explore the Arctic ocean, ice and atmosphere system; Arctic ecosystems from the "charismatic megafauna" (polar bears and more) to the (not so charismatic?) microbes that exist inside the matrix structure of sea-ice; and how humans interact with the Arctic system. Students consider how the components interact, how they are changing, what the future may hold. The course is offered to interest both those considering a major in science and those who seek a career in many non-science fields, including education, government advising, and Arctic-relevant industries.

The highlight of the course will be a week-long "field trip" in early March 2022 to Utqiagvik, AK on the edge of the Arctic Ocean. This will be a unique opportunity to travel to an incredibly remote region of the earth, and learn techniques for collecting samples from the sea ice and the ocean beneath. Students will learn how to core sea ice, measure snow cover, and collect temperature, salinity and light measurements under the ice. The data will be analyzed in the lab, and is being presented here for the first time.

Authentic field experiences like this are important in helping undergraduates develop their curiosity and interests, and in motivating them to learn more! The students will also visit the NOAA, atmospheric baseline observatory, Iñupiat Heritage Center, and the Utqiagvik archeology lab.

Presenting Author Name/s

Elizabeth Smith

Faculty Advisor/Mentor

Victoria Hill

College Affiliation

College of Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster

Disciplines

Climate | Environmental Studies | Geographic Information Sciences | Oceanography | Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology | Physical and Environmental Geography | Remote Sensing

Session Title

Poster Session

Location

Learning Commons @ Perry Library

Start Date

3-19-2022 9:00 AM

End Date

3-19-2022 11:00 AM

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Mar 19th, 9:00 AM Mar 19th, 11:00 AM

Climate Change in the Arctic: What Everyone Should Know About the Arctic in Our World Today

Learning Commons @ Perry Library

Recent years show unprecedented change in the ice-covered Arctic Ocean, however, many peoples’ understanding of this system is limited. OES 395 is a topics course called Arctic Climate Change and aims to provide an introduction to Arctic science, how the Arctic is changing and the impact those changes may have on us. Through traditional lectures, and hands-on data analysis, students will explore the Arctic ocean, ice and atmosphere system; Arctic ecosystems from the "charismatic megafauna" (polar bears and more) to the (not so charismatic?) microbes that exist inside the matrix structure of sea-ice; and how humans interact with the Arctic system. Students consider how the components interact, how they are changing, what the future may hold. The course is offered to interest both those considering a major in science and those who seek a career in many non-science fields, including education, government advising, and Arctic-relevant industries.

The highlight of the course will be a week-long "field trip" in early March 2022 to Utqiagvik, AK on the edge of the Arctic Ocean. This will be a unique opportunity to travel to an incredibly remote region of the earth, and learn techniques for collecting samples from the sea ice and the ocean beneath. Students will learn how to core sea ice, measure snow cover, and collect temperature, salinity and light measurements under the ice. The data will be analyzed in the lab, and is being presented here for the first time.

Authentic field experiences like this are important in helping undergraduates develop their curiosity and interests, and in motivating them to learn more! The students will also visit the NOAA, atmospheric baseline observatory, Iñupiat Heritage Center, and the Utqiagvik archeology lab.