Title

Ancient Roman Glass

Description/Abstract/Artist Statement

The Hermitage Museum and Gardens here in Norfolk hosts a surprisingly strong collection of ancient Roman glass vessels collected by Florence Sloane in the early 20th century. These glass objects have not only never been studied before, but they have also never been on display. Our poster is the presentation of some early efforts to study the glass and to make inferences about the people who made it and the woman who collected it. We drew every vase, we photographed with meter scales, and we made photogrammetric models. We also researched comparanda from other sites and museums to help us understand the social and historical context of such glass objects. As artists, we focused primarily on process and practice, reverse engineering how the ancient glass blowers made these object. Finally, we used archival evidence to explore why and how Sloane initially collected the objects and what that reveals about her as a person, because she seems to have intended them to serve a didactic function.

Presenting Author Name/s

Holly Castle and Ann-Claire Wood

Faculty Advisor/Mentor

Jared Benton

College Affiliation

College of Arts & Letters

Presentation Type

Poster

Disciplines

Ancient History, Greek and Roman through Late Antiquity | Glass Arts

Session Title

Poster Session

Location

Learning Commons @ Perry Library

Start Date

3-19-2022 9:00 AM

End Date

3-19-2022 11:00 AM

Upload File

wf_yes

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 19th, 9:00 AM Mar 19th, 11:00 AM

Ancient Roman Glass

Learning Commons @ Perry Library

The Hermitage Museum and Gardens here in Norfolk hosts a surprisingly strong collection of ancient Roman glass vessels collected by Florence Sloane in the early 20th century. These glass objects have not only never been studied before, but they have also never been on display. Our poster is the presentation of some early efforts to study the glass and to make inferences about the people who made it and the woman who collected it. We drew every vase, we photographed with meter scales, and we made photogrammetric models. We also researched comparanda from other sites and museums to help us understand the social and historical context of such glass objects. As artists, we focused primarily on process and practice, reverse engineering how the ancient glass blowers made these object. Finally, we used archival evidence to explore why and how Sloane initially collected the objects and what that reveals about her as a person, because she seems to have intended them to serve a didactic function.