Date of Award

Spring 1995

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Program/Concentration

Urban Services - Urban Education

Committee Director

Steven L. Purcell

Committee Member

Robert A. Lucking

Committee Member

James C. Phillips

Committee Member

Jane M. Hager

Committee Member

Stephen G. Greiner

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of technology-rich educational environments on student academic achievement and attitude. The primary independent variable was the type of school (technology-rich school (TRS) and traditional school (TS)). Additional independent variables included gender, ethnicity, and computer ownership. The dependent variables were: (1) student academic achievement (Iowa Tests of Basic Skills (4th-grade), Virginia's Literacy Passport Test (6th-grade), and Tests of Achievement and Proficiency (11th-grade)) and (2) and student attitudes (questionnaire).

The design examined the differences between TRS and TS (N = 1088). Compared were 4th-grade elementary school students attending a TRS (n = 47) and a TS (n = 42); 6th-grade middle school students attending a TRS (n = 337) and a TS (n = 244); and 11th-grade high school students attending a TRS (n = 248) and a TS (n = 170). An examination of pre-treatment academic achievement data indicated no significant differences between the treatment and comparison groups.

Academic achievement findings indicated that: 4th-grade TRS students' ITBS scores were higher than 4th-grade TS students (p = 0.0441) based on type of school and computer ownership; 6th-grade TRS students' LPT scores were higher than 6th-grade TS students (p = 0.0071); 11th-grade TRS students' TAP scores were higher than 11th-grade TS students (p = 0.0009), based on the interaction of type of school, gender, and ownership.

Attitude findings indicated that: 6th-grade TRS students had higher attitude-toward-school scores (p = 0.0001) and composite-attitude scores (p = 0.0044); 6th-grade TRS students had higher attitude-toward-school scores (p = 0.0121), attitude-toward-technology (p = 0.0176), and composite-attitude scores (p = 0.0042) based on the interaction of type of school, gender, and computer ownership; 11th-grade TRS students had higher attitude-toward-school scores (p = 0.0116), attitude-toward-technology (p = 0.0095), and composite-attitude scores (p = 0.0047); and, 11th-grade students had higher attitude-toward-school scores (p = 0.0334) based on the interaction of type of school and gender. The overall findings indicated that TRS environments contribute to increased academic achievement of 4th-grade, 6th-grade, and 11th-grade students and contribute to positive student attitudes toward school, technology, and overall attitude for 6th-grade and 11th-grade students.

DOI

10.25777/g739-mt72

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