Date of Award

Winter 1986

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Program/Concentration

Urban Services - Urban Education

Committee Director

Franklin Ross Jones

Committee Member

Robert MacDonald

Committee Member

Raymond F. Morgan

Committee Member

Donald A, Myers

Abstract

This study sought to (1) identify the number and demographic characteristics of students served by the remedial programs, (2) determine academic achievement and persistence of these students, (3) assess the performance of developmental reading and writing students in regular college English and regular college history classes, (4) identify components and characteristics used in the developmental programs which are associated with the success rate of developmental students and (5) assess the effectiveness of developmental education programs based on the evaluation of the number of students completing degree programs. The academic years under consideration are 1980 through 1985.

The study employed two approaches: (1) a descriptive analysis of the variables of age, sex and race, (2) a statistical analysis utilizing the Chi Square, analysis of variance and the two sample t-test to determine relationships between (a) developmental courses and demographic variables, (b) grades received in developmental courses and persistence, (c) success in regular college English and history classes and successful completion of developmental writing and reading classes, (d) graduation rates for developmental and nondevelopmental reading and writing programs and the Special Services Program.

The descriptive analysis revealed that 29 percent of the entering freshman class were deficient in reading and writing skills. Analysis of variance of the demographic variables of age, sex and race revealed that the only significant demographic variable was race. A Sheffe's Test revealed that the nonwhite group had a higher mean level of success.

The Chi Square Test produced the following results: (1) There is a difference between success in developmental reading and the number of semesters enrolled. (2) Success in developmental writing and the number of semesters enrolled approached significance. (3) No significant association between success in regular English classes and successful completion of developmental writing courses was found. (4) A significant association was shown between success in regular history classes and successful completion of developmental reading classes. (5) The developmental students graduated at a significantly higher rate. The t-test revealed no significant difference between success in developmental reading and writing programs and participation in the Special Services Program

DOI

10.25777/a06t-7448

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