Date of Award

Summer 1997

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Program/Concentration

Urban Services - Urban Education

Committee Director

Dana Burnett

Committee Member

Lindsay Rettie

Committee Member

Steven Gaither

Committee Member

Rebecca S. Bowers

Committee Member

Donna B. Evans

Abstract

This descriptive correlational study was designed to explore job satisfaction and collegial support in relation to the retention of nurse educators.

A survey questionnaire adapted from Batiste-Beaty (1990/1991) was used to collect data on nurse educators' retention rates and their perceptions of job satisfaction and collegial support in their present institutions. The survey was distributed to the 350 faculty members in the 12 baccalaureate and higher degree nursing programs in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The survey had a 51% return rate, with a total of 178 respondents. The two primary statistical procedures used in analyzing the data were Pearson's product-moment correlation and analysis of variance.

The data supported the first hypothesis, indicating that as job satisfaction increases, the likelihood of a faculty member's leaving his or her present position decreases. The second hypothesis was also supported in part, indicating that as the perception of collegial support increases, the probability of a faculty member's leaving his or her current institution decreases. The third hypothesis, which stated that perceived job satisfaction would vary on the basis of four professional-demographic variables (academic rank, tenure status, level of professional education and age) was supported in all but one area, age. The fourth hypothesis which stated that perceived collegial support will vary on the basis of the four professional-demographic variables was supported only in part. It varied only on the basis of academic rank.

The findings revealed that job satisfaction and collegial support were correlated with retention of nurse educators in baccalaureate and higher degree nursing programs in Virginia. Additionally, significant relationships between the professional-demographic variables of academic rank, tenure status, and level of professional education and job satisfaction were found. A positive relationship was found between academic rank and collegial support. However, no relationships were found between age and the variables of job satisfaction and collegial support.

It is suggested that data from this study may be useful in considering issues of retention as the current and projected nursing supply-and-demand imbalance becomes a reality within the new millennium.

DOI

10.25777/6zfb-4m03

ISBN

9780591623437

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