Date of Award

Summer 1994

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Program/Concentration

Urban Services - Urban Education

Committee Director

Petra Snowden

Committee Member

Beverly Johnson

Committee Member

Michael Woodhouse

Committee Member

Jane Hager

Committee Member

Stephen Greiner

Abstract

This study examined the effects of athletic participation on self-concept, daily school attendance, and grade point average on 503 seventh grade students in urban middle schools. A 2 x 3 factorial MANOVA analyzed self-concept data to determine differences in self-concept associated with the levels of athletic participation with that of pre- and post-treatment test periods. Tukey's post hoc tests were incorporated when a significant F ratio was demonstrated (p< 0.05). Significant differences were noted in four areas of self-concept as defined by Piers-Harris (1984): (1) intellectual and school status (Tukey, p< 0.05), (2) physical appearance and attributes (Tukey, p< 0.05), (3) anxiety (Tukey, p< 0.05), and (4) popularity (Tukey, p< 0.05). No significant differences were noted in three areas of self-concept: (1) behavior, (2) happiness and satisfaction, and (3) self-concept total.

A 3 x 3 factorial ANOVA demonstrated statistical differences in daily school attendance between female students participating in interscholastic athletics with female students not participating in interscholastic athletics. Daily school attendance reports were collected to coincide with three grading periods. Tukey's post hoc tests were incorporated when a significant F ratio was demonstrated (Tukey, p< 0.05). Students not participating in interscholastic athletics noted higher absenteeism than students who participated in interscholastic athletics (Tukey, p< 0.05).

A 3 x 3 factorial ANOVA demonstrated statistical differences in grade point averages between female students participating in interscholastic athletics with those female students not participating in interscholastic athletics. Grade point averages of the two-sport participants were significantly higher than the one-sport participants (Tukey, p< 0.05). Grade point averages of the one-sport participants were significantly higher than the no-sport participants (Tukey, p< 0.05).

Results suggest positive effects of athletic participation on self-concept, daily school attendance, and grade point average of female seventh grade students in urban middle schools participating in interscholastic sports programs.

DOI

10.25777/vwvw-ms18

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