Event Title

Understanding POTS: Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome

Location

Allegheny A, Hotel Madison, JMU

Start Date

4-5-2019 4:20 PM

Description

This presentation will focus on POTS which stands for postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. This is a condition that affects blood flow. “POTS is a form of orthostatic intolerance, the development of symptoms that come on when standing up from a reclining position, and that may be relieved by sitting or lying back down.” There are different forms of POTS in which the body responds to the lack of blood flow differently. As such, treatments vary and can only be applicable once the form is determined. To know if one has POTS, the best test is the tilt-table test. More tests can follow to verify form and damage done by POTS. While the main symptoms are “lightheadedness, fainting, and a rapid increase in heartbeat,” many more are still encountered every day. Most patients are women aged 13-50, but this can affect anyone. This debilitating syndrome is common, but awareness is not.

Presentation Type

Presentation

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Apr 5th, 4:20 PM

Understanding POTS: Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome

Allegheny A, Hotel Madison, JMU

This presentation will focus on POTS which stands for postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. This is a condition that affects blood flow. “POTS is a form of orthostatic intolerance, the development of symptoms that come on when standing up from a reclining position, and that may be relieved by sitting or lying back down.” There are different forms of POTS in which the body responds to the lack of blood flow differently. As such, treatments vary and can only be applicable once the form is determined. To know if one has POTS, the best test is the tilt-table test. More tests can follow to verify form and damage done by POTS. While the main symptoms are “lightheadedness, fainting, and a rapid increase in heartbeat,” many more are still encountered every day. Most patients are women aged 13-50, but this can affect anyone. This debilitating syndrome is common, but awareness is not.