Event Title

Cadaver Brains: A Comparative Analysis to Aide in Post-Mortem Identification of Morphological and Pathological Structures Key to Alzheimer’s Diagnosis

Location

Taylor 405, Madison Union, JMU

Start Date

4-6-2019 9:00 AM

Description

Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, can be clinically diagnosed in patients through identification of common symptoms, typically early episodic memory loss and progressive cognitive and functional impairments. However, it is not until post-mortem that a definitive diagnosis of AD can be made using the presence of pathological hallmarks: amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Comparison of two cadaver brains will provide an in-depth look at the pathological differences between a “healthy” brain and one with AD. Overall size and weight differences as well as discrepancies in regions like the lateral ventricle, hippocampus, cerebral cortex and the temporal lobe (entorhinal cortex) will be examined. Preparation and analysis of microscopic slides for examination of cellular density and the presence of plaques and tangles can provide a definitive post-mortem diagnosis. Consideration will also be given to the vascularization of both brains, as those with AD also tend to incur vascular problems.

Presentation Type

Poster

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 6th, 9:00 AM

Cadaver Brains: A Comparative Analysis to Aide in Post-Mortem Identification of Morphological and Pathological Structures Key to Alzheimer’s Diagnosis

Taylor 405, Madison Union, JMU

Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, can be clinically diagnosed in patients through identification of common symptoms, typically early episodic memory loss and progressive cognitive and functional impairments. However, it is not until post-mortem that a definitive diagnosis of AD can be made using the presence of pathological hallmarks: amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Comparison of two cadaver brains will provide an in-depth look at the pathological differences between a “healthy” brain and one with AD. Overall size and weight differences as well as discrepancies in regions like the lateral ventricle, hippocampus, cerebral cortex and the temporal lobe (entorhinal cortex) will be examined. Preparation and analysis of microscopic slides for examination of cellular density and the presence of plaques and tangles can provide a definitive post-mortem diagnosis. Consideration will also be given to the vascularization of both brains, as those with AD also tend to incur vascular problems.