Event Title

Incorporation of Haptic and Visual Feedback with Myoelectric Prosthesis

Location

Taylor 405, Madison Union, JMU

Start Date

4-6-2019 9:00 AM

Description

Certain unavoidable issues that are related to limb-loss include the financial burden of medical bills, prosthetic-electronics maintenance, device design, training software, and emotional stress. With traditional prosthetics, issues can also arise with the connection and acceptance of the prosthetic as an extension of the user. Visually, the loss of an arm or hand can discourage the user and causes disconnection between them and the prosthetic. With a negative mental state, people are less likely to accept a prosthesis and make progress when undergoing rehabilitation. Incorporation of virtual reality games allows the user to see a virtual hand that responds to the myoelectric signal created from muscles in the residual arm. This project addresses one feature that requires particular improvement which is rehabilitatory training. Through proper training with a myoelectric prosthesis, the user can learn to accept the prosthesis as an extension of themselves instead of a tool. Overall the question I am addressing is: can open source technologies be used to create engaging training through virtual reality in a low-cost, 3D printed myoelectric arm? Using a combination of open source platforms like Unity and Oculus Go; alongside the cost-effective alternative of 3D printing can facilitate major improvements to the financial cost of prosthetics and training mechanisms. By combining sample codes for the myoelectric arm band and with Oculus go facilitating the visual feedback, the user can flex their residual limb and see a fist form on the screen. This type of training could shorten the total training time and make the experience fun for both adults and children while also providing haptic and visual feedback. The expenses would decrease significantly, and open source coding would be available to people all over the world.

Presentation Type

Poster

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 6th, 9:00 AM

Incorporation of Haptic and Visual Feedback with Myoelectric Prosthesis

Taylor 405, Madison Union, JMU

Certain unavoidable issues that are related to limb-loss include the financial burden of medical bills, prosthetic-electronics maintenance, device design, training software, and emotional stress. With traditional prosthetics, issues can also arise with the connection and acceptance of the prosthetic as an extension of the user. Visually, the loss of an arm or hand can discourage the user and causes disconnection between them and the prosthetic. With a negative mental state, people are less likely to accept a prosthesis and make progress when undergoing rehabilitation. Incorporation of virtual reality games allows the user to see a virtual hand that responds to the myoelectric signal created from muscles in the residual arm. This project addresses one feature that requires particular improvement which is rehabilitatory training. Through proper training with a myoelectric prosthesis, the user can learn to accept the prosthesis as an extension of themselves instead of a tool. Overall the question I am addressing is: can open source technologies be used to create engaging training through virtual reality in a low-cost, 3D printed myoelectric arm? Using a combination of open source platforms like Unity and Oculus Go; alongside the cost-effective alternative of 3D printing can facilitate major improvements to the financial cost of prosthetics and training mechanisms. By combining sample codes for the myoelectric arm band and with Oculus go facilitating the visual feedback, the user can flex their residual limb and see a fist form on the screen. This type of training could shorten the total training time and make the experience fun for both adults and children while also providing haptic and visual feedback. The expenses would decrease significantly, and open source coding would be available to people all over the world.