Event Title

The Homelessness Crisis: Applications of Game Theory on Public Health

Date

April 2020

Description

Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach, we explored a public health concern in Virginia Beach using mathematical modeling. As homelessness increases nationwide, it is imperative for communities to create and implement effective plans to address the dilemma. In this game, we limited the players to the local government and the homeless population noting that each player’s action, or lack thereof, initiates a reaction from the other. Using such information, we built a game tree and outcomes. Next, we ranked these outcomes based on the preferences of each player. Assumptions for the model were based on research and prior honors volunteer experience. Prudential strategies, nash equilibria, dominating strategies, and backwards induction were used to make our recommendations for each player. Finally, these recommendations were evaluated according to what actually occurred.

Comments

This oral presentation is based on a group research project.

Presentation Type

Presentation

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The Homelessness Crisis: Applications of Game Theory on Public Health

Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach, we explored a public health concern in Virginia Beach using mathematical modeling. As homelessness increases nationwide, it is imperative for communities to create and implement effective plans to address the dilemma. In this game, we limited the players to the local government and the homeless population noting that each player’s action, or lack thereof, initiates a reaction from the other. Using such information, we built a game tree and outcomes. Next, we ranked these outcomes based on the preferences of each player. Assumptions for the model were based on research and prior honors volunteer experience. Prudential strategies, nash equilibria, dominating strategies, and backwards induction were used to make our recommendations for each player. Finally, these recommendations were evaluated according to what actually occurred.