Event Title

"The Effect of Information Interventions on Retention Among University of Lynchburg Students "

Presenter Information

Sara Mills, University of Lynchburg

Date

April 2020

Description

College retention rates are a frequently discussed topic amid declining retention and rising time to degree completion. My research evaluates whether a targeted nudging program has any impact on second-year students retaining to their third year at the University of Lynchburg. Nudging defined as, “…any aspect of the choice architecture that alters people's behaviour in a predictable way without forbidding any options or significantly changing their economic incentives…” as written by Thaler and Sunstein (2008). I analyzed the impact of nudging student behavior via weekly text alerts centered around Academic, Social, Career, and/or Financial Information students self-selected to receive on GPA and, post-graduation, and retention rates. I found no significant difference in GPA between the control and test group. However, the additional alerts provided an increase in average event attendance. Results of this study provide knowledge on implementation of a low-cost program with the potential of increasing student involvement.

Comments

This oral presentation is based on an individual research project.

Presentation Type

Presentation

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"The Effect of Information Interventions on Retention Among University of Lynchburg Students "

College retention rates are a frequently discussed topic amid declining retention and rising time to degree completion. My research evaluates whether a targeted nudging program has any impact on second-year students retaining to their third year at the University of Lynchburg. Nudging defined as, “…any aspect of the choice architecture that alters people's behaviour in a predictable way without forbidding any options or significantly changing their economic incentives…” as written by Thaler and Sunstein (2008). I analyzed the impact of nudging student behavior via weekly text alerts centered around Academic, Social, Career, and/or Financial Information students self-selected to receive on GPA and, post-graduation, and retention rates. I found no significant difference in GPA between the control and test group. However, the additional alerts provided an increase in average event attendance. Results of this study provide knowledge on implementation of a low-cost program with the potential of increasing student involvement.