Event Title

The Impact of Temporary Gender Embodiment on the Accuracy of Personality Judgment: Drag Performance as a Lens

Description

Accurately perceiving the personalities of others may allow a person to be more successful in social and professional settings. The present study assessed the influence of drag performance on personality judgment accuracy. Due to their heightened interpersonal orientation (propensity to maintain interpersonal relationships) and temporary embodiment of women, drag performers possess the qualities that are associated with more accurate judgments of the personalities of others (Chan et al., 2011; Vogt & Colvin, 2003) in order to make their findings more specific. Drag performers were recruited throughout the country, while the non-drag population were faculty, staff, and students at the University of Lynchburg. Both groups evaluated the personalities of four target people in interview-style videos. The accuracy of the two groups' judgments were compared using the Big Five personality assessment. It was found that the two groups did not differ in terms of judgmental accuracy.

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This oral presentation is based on an individual research project.

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The Impact of Temporary Gender Embodiment on the Accuracy of Personality Judgment: Drag Performance as a Lens

Accurately perceiving the personalities of others may allow a person to be more successful in social and professional settings. The present study assessed the influence of drag performance on personality judgment accuracy. Due to their heightened interpersonal orientation (propensity to maintain interpersonal relationships) and temporary embodiment of women, drag performers possess the qualities that are associated with more accurate judgments of the personalities of others (Chan et al., 2011; Vogt & Colvin, 2003) in order to make their findings more specific. Drag performers were recruited throughout the country, while the non-drag population were faculty, staff, and students at the University of Lynchburg. Both groups evaluated the personalities of four target people in interview-style videos. The accuracy of the two groups' judgments were compared using the Big Five personality assessment. It was found that the two groups did not differ in terms of judgmental accuracy.