Event Title

"Why Is My Voice Defined By A Color?”: Normalizing African American Vernacular English

Presenter Information

Myana Mabry, Hampton University

Date

April 2020

Description

African-American Vernacular English, also known as “black slang”, is often times overlooked and deemed as unacceptable when projected in today’s society. Terms such as “ghetto”, “bad English”, and “ebonics” are often associated with the dialect of a black person’s tongue-yet nothing is actually wrong with the way they speak. Something is wrong with this normalized system which is derived from racism and linguistic prejudice. African American Vernacular English should be embraced throughout society as a dialect of English. Due to systematic racism in America, African American Vernacular English is ruled as “incorrect” or “incoherent”. To that I say: “ That’s straight bogus."

Comments

This flash talk is based on an individual research project.

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"Why Is My Voice Defined By A Color?”: Normalizing African American Vernacular English

African-American Vernacular English, also known as “black slang”, is often times overlooked and deemed as unacceptable when projected in today’s society. Terms such as “ghetto”, “bad English”, and “ebonics” are often associated with the dialect of a black person’s tongue-yet nothing is actually wrong with the way they speak. Something is wrong with this normalized system which is derived from racism and linguistic prejudice. African American Vernacular English should be embraced throughout society as a dialect of English. Due to systematic racism in America, African American Vernacular English is ruled as “incorrect” or “incoherent”. To that I say: “ That’s straight bogus."