Event Title

Establishing Biosimilar Insulin as an Alternative to Originator Insulin through Patient Education: Increasing Accessibility and Affordability

Date

April 2020

Description

Biosimilar insulin, as an alternative to originator insulin, is combative to the issue of continuously rising prices of insulin, reducing costs for patients. Although requirements include that the primary amino acid sequences of biosimilar insulin is identical to originator insulin, proving comparable competence, many patients remain unaware of the comparability. Patient education methods were evaluated in order to create a patient education model for biosimilar insulin that allows physicians to properly communicate the interchangeability of biosimilar insulin. Due to subjective verbal risk-descriptors (‘common’, ‘likely’, ‘high chance’) as the current method of reporting probability risk of adverse effects, patients are uneducated on the comparability of biosimilar insulin, deterring the choice of a more accessible and interchangeable treatment option. Providing patients with graphical and numerical data on comparability to originator insulin prevents subjective interpretation and overestimation of risk, allowing patients to make educated decisions about healthcare options, ultimately increasing affordability and accessibility.

Comments

This poster based on an individual research project.

Presentation Type

Poster

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Establishing Biosimilar Insulin as an Alternative to Originator Insulin through Patient Education: Increasing Accessibility and Affordability

Biosimilar insulin, as an alternative to originator insulin, is combative to the issue of continuously rising prices of insulin, reducing costs for patients. Although requirements include that the primary amino acid sequences of biosimilar insulin is identical to originator insulin, proving comparable competence, many patients remain unaware of the comparability. Patient education methods were evaluated in order to create a patient education model for biosimilar insulin that allows physicians to properly communicate the interchangeability of biosimilar insulin. Due to subjective verbal risk-descriptors (‘common’, ‘likely’, ‘high chance’) as the current method of reporting probability risk of adverse effects, patients are uneducated on the comparability of biosimilar insulin, deterring the choice of a more accessible and interchangeable treatment option. Providing patients with graphical and numerical data on comparability to originator insulin prevents subjective interpretation and overestimation of risk, allowing patients to make educated decisions about healthcare options, ultimately increasing affordability and accessibility.