Event Title

Secular Stagnation in the United States

Date

April 2020

Description

Secular Stagnation is the premise that the United States is entering an era characterized by diminishing long run economic growth. The introduction of the zero-bound interest rate limiting inflationary tension presides as the primary macroeconomic theory behind sluggish American economic performance as real GDP failed to meet pre-2007 potential levels and each subsequent estimate since 2008. The development of Secular Stagnation as a theory is not an entirely modern concept, but it may be affecting modernized and increasingly global economies throughout the world. To fully ascertain the wide scope of Secular Stagnation, economists need to determine the assumptions behind the theoretical model, identify possible shocks to the model, and compare the theoretical findings to real world data in order to establish the validity of secular stagnation as a limiting force in the United States economy.

Comments

This poster based on an individual research project.

Presentation Type

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Secular Stagnation in the United States

Secular Stagnation is the premise that the United States is entering an era characterized by diminishing long run economic growth. The introduction of the zero-bound interest rate limiting inflationary tension presides as the primary macroeconomic theory behind sluggish American economic performance as real GDP failed to meet pre-2007 potential levels and each subsequent estimate since 2008. The development of Secular Stagnation as a theory is not an entirely modern concept, but it may be affecting modernized and increasingly global economies throughout the world. To fully ascertain the wide scope of Secular Stagnation, economists need to determine the assumptions behind the theoretical model, identify possible shocks to the model, and compare the theoretical findings to real world data in order to establish the validity of secular stagnation as a limiting force in the United States economy.