Event Title

Soil Sciences in Anthropological Archaeology

Date

April 2020

Description

A primary principle in archaeology is “context is everything,” and in most situations this “context” is soil. By studying the soil, archaeologist can better understand and see many aspects that help in analyzing the nature of the archaeological site. Archaeology borrows from many scientific disciplines. Appropriations come from, but most definitely are not limited to, geology, pedology, and ecology. Under the broad category of geology, there is also geoarchaeology and geochemistry. Understanding these components that contribute to the state of a site helps to better understand how a site got to be the way that it is. What disturbances are natural? What disturbances are the effects of humans? A recent project in southwestern Georgia (U.S.) gives a great example of the footprint human disturbances can leave within the soil and how these past disturbances can help archaeologists today better understand and analyze cultures of the past.

Comments

This poster based on an individual research project.

Presentation Type

Poster

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Soil Sciences in Anthropological Archaeology

A primary principle in archaeology is “context is everything,” and in most situations this “context” is soil. By studying the soil, archaeologist can better understand and see many aspects that help in analyzing the nature of the archaeological site. Archaeology borrows from many scientific disciplines. Appropriations come from, but most definitely are not limited to, geology, pedology, and ecology. Under the broad category of geology, there is also geoarchaeology and geochemistry. Understanding these components that contribute to the state of a site helps to better understand how a site got to be the way that it is. What disturbances are natural? What disturbances are the effects of humans? A recent project in southwestern Georgia (U.S.) gives a great example of the footprint human disturbances can leave within the soil and how these past disturbances can help archaeologists today better understand and analyze cultures of the past.