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Event Title

Onset and Degree of Sport Specialization in Relation to Injury Risk

Date

4-10-2021

Location

Online

Description

The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between the onset and degree of sport specialization and injury rates in female collegiate athletes. The most popular definitions of sports specialization include the idea that sport specialization incorporates intense, year-round training in a single sport at the exclusion of other sports (Jayanthi, Post, Laury & Fabricant, 2019). Methods: This survey's research design was quantitative that included convenience sample of female athletes from Marymount University. An online google survey was used to gather data regarding personal demographics, onset and degree of sport specialization, and current and past injury rates. ANOVA analysis and Pearson's correlation coefficient were used to determine an association between the variables. The only statistically significant variable found was degree of specialization among the basketball players F(2,39) = 3.92, p = .028. There was no significance between degree of sports specialization and incidences of injuries or, the age of onset and total injuries. Results from this research found that the women's basketball sample had a higher degree of sport specialization than the soccer and volleyball players based on Jayanthi's Three Point Specialization scale.

Presentation Type

Poster

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Onset and Degree of Sport Specialization in Relation to Injury Risk

Online

The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between the onset and degree of sport specialization and injury rates in female collegiate athletes. The most popular definitions of sports specialization include the idea that sport specialization incorporates intense, year-round training in a single sport at the exclusion of other sports (Jayanthi, Post, Laury & Fabricant, 2019). Methods: This survey's research design was quantitative that included convenience sample of female athletes from Marymount University. An online google survey was used to gather data regarding personal demographics, onset and degree of sport specialization, and current and past injury rates. ANOVA analysis and Pearson's correlation coefficient were used to determine an association between the variables. The only statistically significant variable found was degree of specialization among the basketball players F(2,39) = 3.92, p = .028. There was no significance between degree of sports specialization and incidences of injuries or, the age of onset and total injuries. Results from this research found that the women's basketball sample had a higher degree of sport specialization than the soccer and volleyball players based on Jayanthi's Three Point Specialization scale.