Posters

Event Title

Canine Cognitive Dysfunction (CCD), Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), and β-Amyloid Accumulation: Using CCD as a Reference for the Development of AD Treatments and Therapies

Date

4-10-2021

Location

Online

Description

I researched the similarities and differences between Canine Cognitive Dysfunction (CCD)—a disease with symptoms and progression pattern that parallels Alzheimer’s Disease (AD)—and AD. I studied how β-amyloid accumulates in various brain regions—such as the prefrontal, occipital, entorhinal and parietal cortices—in canines to determine how β-amyloid accumulation is associated with the development of behaviors signifying cognitive decline observed in CCD and AD—such as changes in the sleep-wake cycle, social interaction, housetraining, and general orientation—in order to understand how neuroscientists may be able to derive new understandings from a canine model with CCD, and apply these developments to humans with AD in order to develop therapies and treatments for AD. I discovered that domestic canines and humans share the same environmental stressors, develop oxidative stress in a similar manner, and β-amyloid accumulation in the canine brain parallels β-amyloid accumulation in the human brain. Additionally, canine response to pharmaceuticals mimics human response to pharmaceuticals.

Presentation Type

Poster

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Canine Cognitive Dysfunction (CCD), Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), and β-Amyloid Accumulation: Using CCD as a Reference for the Development of AD Treatments and Therapies

Online

I researched the similarities and differences between Canine Cognitive Dysfunction (CCD)—a disease with symptoms and progression pattern that parallels Alzheimer’s Disease (AD)—and AD. I studied how β-amyloid accumulates in various brain regions—such as the prefrontal, occipital, entorhinal and parietal cortices—in canines to determine how β-amyloid accumulation is associated with the development of behaviors signifying cognitive decline observed in CCD and AD—such as changes in the sleep-wake cycle, social interaction, housetraining, and general orientation—in order to understand how neuroscientists may be able to derive new understandings from a canine model with CCD, and apply these developments to humans with AD in order to develop therapies and treatments for AD. I discovered that domestic canines and humans share the same environmental stressors, develop oxidative stress in a similar manner, and β-amyloid accumulation in the canine brain parallels β-amyloid accumulation in the human brain. Additionally, canine response to pharmaceuticals mimics human response to pharmaceuticals.