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Event Title

The Effect of Varying Concentrations of Penicillin-Streptomycin on E. coli Growth

Date

April 2021

Location

Online

Description

Since the 1950s, antibiotics have been used to treat bacterial infections in humans, pets, and livestock successfully. More recently, however, antibiotic overuse has led to resistance, presenting doctors a more challenging treatment course. Moreover, many patients do not finish their prescription, exposing the bacteria to the antibiotic but possibly not enough to eradicate the infection. The experiment evaluates Escherichia coli growth in different concentrations of the antibiotic penicillin-streptomycin. The concentrations vary from the minimal inhibitory concentration to a very small quantity to simulate low-concentration exposure, exploring the effects of the lowly-concentrated exposure of antibiotics on bacteria and resistance possibilities. We predict the lowest concentrations of penicillin-streptomycin will slow growth, but cells will grow. Results showed when the concentration was high, around 2.0 ug/mL, there was no growth. When penicillin-streptomycin was present but at low concentrations, growth was either delayed or grew at the same rate as the control sample. Findings from the experiments can add to the literature for the minimal inhibitory concentration of penicillin-streptomycin for E. coli and for bacterial growth in low antibiotic levels. The findings may also lead to other experiments examining methods for killing resistant cells, such as phage therapy and addition of other metabolites.

Presentation Type

Presentation

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The Effect of Varying Concentrations of Penicillin-Streptomycin on E. coli Growth

Online

Since the 1950s, antibiotics have been used to treat bacterial infections in humans, pets, and livestock successfully. More recently, however, antibiotic overuse has led to resistance, presenting doctors a more challenging treatment course. Moreover, many patients do not finish their prescription, exposing the bacteria to the antibiotic but possibly not enough to eradicate the infection. The experiment evaluates Escherichia coli growth in different concentrations of the antibiotic penicillin-streptomycin. The concentrations vary from the minimal inhibitory concentration to a very small quantity to simulate low-concentration exposure, exploring the effects of the lowly-concentrated exposure of antibiotics on bacteria and resistance possibilities. We predict the lowest concentrations of penicillin-streptomycin will slow growth, but cells will grow. Results showed when the concentration was high, around 2.0 ug/mL, there was no growth. When penicillin-streptomycin was present but at low concentrations, growth was either delayed or grew at the same rate as the control sample. Findings from the experiments can add to the literature for the minimal inhibitory concentration of penicillin-streptomycin for E. coli and for bacterial growth in low antibiotic levels. The findings may also lead to other experiments examining methods for killing resistant cells, such as phage therapy and addition of other metabolites.