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Event Title

Literacy Development in Preschoolers with Educational Apps

Date

April 2021

Location

Online

Description

The purpose of this literature review is to investigate whether literacy apps actually improve the literacy skills of preschool children. In recent years learning apps for children has increased. Over 80% of the highest selling educational apps are marketed towards children, about half of these are aimed at preschoolers, and most of these are literacy-focused (Shuler et al., 2012). Literature for this review was found on PsychNet, Proquest Psychology Database, and Google Scholar. A connection between literacy applications and preschool children’s literacy levels was included in the review. The consensus based on the articles reviewed is that apps are beneficial for reinforcing information already learned rather than new material (Dore et al., 2019; Samur, 2019; Schmitt et al., 2018). However, some studies suggest material that requires memorization like sight words could be taught as new material from an app. Papers reviewed emphasize the importance of including professionals with knowledge of how children learn in the development and design of future apps. Results from this paper also highly encourage the development of app design standards based on the Science of Learning.

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Literacy Development in Preschoolers with Educational Apps

Online

The purpose of this literature review is to investigate whether literacy apps actually improve the literacy skills of preschool children. In recent years learning apps for children has increased. Over 80% of the highest selling educational apps are marketed towards children, about half of these are aimed at preschoolers, and most of these are literacy-focused (Shuler et al., 2012). Literature for this review was found on PsychNet, Proquest Psychology Database, and Google Scholar. A connection between literacy applications and preschool children’s literacy levels was included in the review. The consensus based on the articles reviewed is that apps are beneficial for reinforcing information already learned rather than new material (Dore et al., 2019; Samur, 2019; Schmitt et al., 2018). However, some studies suggest material that requires memorization like sight words could be taught as new material from an app. Papers reviewed emphasize the importance of including professionals with knowledge of how children learn in the development and design of future apps. Results from this paper also highly encourage the development of app design standards based on the Science of Learning.