Presentations

Event Title

The Effects of Color

Date

April 2021

Location

Online

Description

Color psychology is the study of how colors can affect humans, both physiologically and psychologically. Past literature has studied warm, cool, and achromatic colors, as well as saturation and brightness. However, research has not studied colors that have both warm and cool characteristics. Additionally, tints, tones, and shades have not been studied. The purpose of this video is to propose a research method that would address these gaps. This research would study the effect of purple (and its tint, tone, and shade) on human emotions in an interior design setting. Data would be collected through a survey method, where participants would rate bipolar adjective pairs, such as happy-sad, on a 7-point Likert scale. Analysis of this data would include an ANOVA test for each adjective pair, as well as post hoc tests. This research would provide a baseline for further research in two gap areas of the literature: colors that are neither warm or cool, and tints, tones, and shades. By providing this baseline, future researchers would be able to build upon these theories, effectively eliminating the gaps.

Presentation Type

Presentation

Streaming Media

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The Effects of Color

Online

Color psychology is the study of how colors can affect humans, both physiologically and psychologically. Past literature has studied warm, cool, and achromatic colors, as well as saturation and brightness. However, research has not studied colors that have both warm and cool characteristics. Additionally, tints, tones, and shades have not been studied. The purpose of this video is to propose a research method that would address these gaps. This research would study the effect of purple (and its tint, tone, and shade) on human emotions in an interior design setting. Data would be collected through a survey method, where participants would rate bipolar adjective pairs, such as happy-sad, on a 7-point Likert scale. Analysis of this data would include an ANOVA test for each adjective pair, as well as post hoc tests. This research would provide a baseline for further research in two gap areas of the literature: colors that are neither warm or cool, and tints, tones, and shades. By providing this baseline, future researchers would be able to build upon these theories, effectively eliminating the gaps.