Event Title

The Effects of Communication Differences on Listeners’ Attitudes of Warmth and Competence, Credibility, Intelligences, and Social Distance

Date

4-8-2022

Location

Schewel 208

Description

Prior research has shown that listeners may hold a variety of negative attitudes towards individuals with speech or language disorders, such as beliefs that they are lower in intelligence, friendliness, or competence. These studies have suggested that attitudes tend to vary based on the type and severity of the disorder, but results are inconclusive on specific communication characteristics impacting perceptions. The present study measured participants’ attitudes towards an actor portraying either a fluency, articulation, voice, or language disorder. The between-subjects design involved participants being randomly assigned to listen to one of the four disorder conditions and then completing scales measuring their beliefs about the speaker’s warmth and competence, credibility, intelligence, and desired social distance. Prior studies have suggested that exposure to individuals with communication disorders may relate to more positive attitudes, so this was assessed in the demographic questionnaire. It is hypothesized that there will be main effects of both communication disorder category and personal contact with individuals who have communication disorders on attitude ratings. Speech language pathologists, disability advocates, and other educators can use information about specific negative attitudes when designing programs to increase knowledge and acceptance of these populations.

Presentation Type

Presentation

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The Effects of Communication Differences on Listeners’ Attitudes of Warmth and Competence, Credibility, Intelligences, and Social Distance

Schewel 208

Prior research has shown that listeners may hold a variety of negative attitudes towards individuals with speech or language disorders, such as beliefs that they are lower in intelligence, friendliness, or competence. These studies have suggested that attitudes tend to vary based on the type and severity of the disorder, but results are inconclusive on specific communication characteristics impacting perceptions. The present study measured participants’ attitudes towards an actor portraying either a fluency, articulation, voice, or language disorder. The between-subjects design involved participants being randomly assigned to listen to one of the four disorder conditions and then completing scales measuring their beliefs about the speaker’s warmth and competence, credibility, intelligence, and desired social distance. Prior studies have suggested that exposure to individuals with communication disorders may relate to more positive attitudes, so this was assessed in the demographic questionnaire. It is hypothesized that there will be main effects of both communication disorder category and personal contact with individuals who have communication disorders on attitude ratings. Speech language pathologists, disability advocates, and other educators can use information about specific negative attitudes when designing programs to increase knowledge and acceptance of these populations.