Event Title

Effect of a Chemistry Case Study on Students’ Understanding of Chemical Bonds

Date

4-9-2022

Location

Schewel 208

Description

Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a group of synthetically produced organic compounds. These compounds have both hydrophobic and lipophobic properties and their unique chemical structure render the chemicals practically non-biodegradable. These compounds are generally used as surfactants or to create products that are water and oil repellent and heat and acid resistant. Over the past few years, PFAS compounds have been receiving increased media attention for their adverse environmental and health effects. PFAS compounds are extremely relevant to college chemistry students because their stability in the environment can be attributed to their chemical structure. PFAS compounds contain the strongest bond in organic chemistry, the carbon-fluorine bond. Our research group has developed a case study focused on PFAS compounds to help students understand important chemistry topics: chemical bonds, electronegativity, atomic radius, bond length, dipole moment, and bond enthalpy. These topics explain why the C-F bond is the strongest bond in chemistry. Here, we present the case study and data analysis from the first round of completed workshops. Data analysis will help identify any statistically significant improvements in students’ survey responses related to their understanding chemical bonds. Therefore, PFAS compounds are relevant both to news outlets and the chemistry classroom.

Presentation Type

Presentation

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Effect of a Chemistry Case Study on Students’ Understanding of Chemical Bonds

Schewel 208

Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a group of synthetically produced organic compounds. These compounds have both hydrophobic and lipophobic properties and their unique chemical structure render the chemicals practically non-biodegradable. These compounds are generally used as surfactants or to create products that are water and oil repellent and heat and acid resistant. Over the past few years, PFAS compounds have been receiving increased media attention for their adverse environmental and health effects. PFAS compounds are extremely relevant to college chemistry students because their stability in the environment can be attributed to their chemical structure. PFAS compounds contain the strongest bond in organic chemistry, the carbon-fluorine bond. Our research group has developed a case study focused on PFAS compounds to help students understand important chemistry topics: chemical bonds, electronegativity, atomic radius, bond length, dipole moment, and bond enthalpy. These topics explain why the C-F bond is the strongest bond in chemistry. Here, we present the case study and data analysis from the first round of completed workshops. Data analysis will help identify any statistically significant improvements in students’ survey responses related to their understanding chemical bonds. Therefore, PFAS compounds are relevant both to news outlets and the chemistry classroom.