Event Title

Analyzing Phylogenetic Relationships of Bacterial Strains in Mycobacterium marinum Using Ortholog Clustering

Location

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Conference Room 1310

Start Date

13-2-2016 11:30 AM

End Date

13-2-2016 12:30 PM

Description

Mycobacterium marinum is a species of bacteria known for its ability to cause fish and zoonotic infections in aquaculture. Phylogenetic analysis of 32 strains of Mycobacterium marinum revealed a clade organization based on host. The strains that were isolated from a broad range of hosts, including humans, fish, and amphibians, formed clade I; those isolated entirely from fish grouped together in clade II. Within clade II, a subgrouping of strains infecting solely hybrid striped bass was termed the KST-clade. The evolutionary paths of these clades were analyzed and compared through ortholog clustering. Each clade’s core genome was defined as the genes present in every strain of a particular grouping. These cores were compared to the entire collection of genes in all 32 strains to determine the presence of genes exclusive to each clade. No such genes were found in clade I, but clade I and KST groupings possessed 7 and 13 respectively. Of these genes, almost all code for functions that have yet to be determined. Further investigation is necessary to determine whether these hypothetical proteins actually play a role in the selection for fish or striped bass hosts in these groupings.

Comments

Faculty Mentor: Dr. David Gauthier

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Feb 13th, 11:30 AM Feb 13th, 12:30 PM

Analyzing Phylogenetic Relationships of Bacterial Strains in Mycobacterium marinum Using Ortholog Clustering

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Conference Room 1310

Mycobacterium marinum is a species of bacteria known for its ability to cause fish and zoonotic infections in aquaculture. Phylogenetic analysis of 32 strains of Mycobacterium marinum revealed a clade organization based on host. The strains that were isolated from a broad range of hosts, including humans, fish, and amphibians, formed clade I; those isolated entirely from fish grouped together in clade II. Within clade II, a subgrouping of strains infecting solely hybrid striped bass was termed the KST-clade. The evolutionary paths of these clades were analyzed and compared through ortholog clustering. Each clade’s core genome was defined as the genes present in every strain of a particular grouping. These cores were compared to the entire collection of genes in all 32 strains to determine the presence of genes exclusive to each clade. No such genes were found in clade I, but clade I and KST groupings possessed 7 and 13 respectively. Of these genes, almost all code for functions that have yet to be determined. Further investigation is necessary to determine whether these hypothetical proteins actually play a role in the selection for fish or striped bass hosts in these groupings.