Date of Award

Summer 8-2022

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Political Science & Geography

Program/Concentration

International Studies

Committee Director

Francis Adams

Committee Member

Jesse Richman

Committee Member

Cesar Pinto

Abstract

This dissertation examines regulatory responses to global private currencies (GPCs). Through detailed analyses of the history and evolution of private digital currencies, and through case studies of the United States, the European Union, and China, this dissertation identifies five factors that condition regulatory responses: (1) compliance with anti-money laundering (AML) laws, (2) compliance with systems built for fiat currencies, (3) degree of transparency in operations, (4) culture of sovereignty within the nation, and (5) great power competition with other nations. Throughout the dissertation, various political, economic, social, technological, legal, and environmental (PESTLE) characteristics of GPCs are highlighted. This dissertation also proposes a ‘game transformation framework’ (GTF) by combining these PESTLE factors with concepts from game theory. A 2x2 game structure is used to analyze strategic interactions between governments in the three case studies and GPCs on a spectrum between cooperation and conflict.

DOI

10.25777/bbr2-fr08

ISBN

9798351481555

ORCID

0000-0003-4114-5743

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