Human Trafficking Post 9/11 Policy and Practice Beyond Cutting the Tail off the Snake

Date of Award

Spring 5-2012

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Political Science & Geography

Program/Concentration

Graduate Program in International studies

Committee Director

Jennifer Fish

Committee Member

Francis Adams

Committee Member

Angelica Huizar

Call Number for Print

Special Collections LD4331.I45 R53 2012

Abstract

The U.S. Department of State estimates that 600,000 to 800,000 victims are trafficked across international borders each year, approximately 14,500 to 17,500 of which are trafficked into the United States. The Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (VTVPA) was created to combat human trafficking in the country, and as a result created the T-visa to provide immigration relief to non-citizen victims of trafficking. In this work I analyze U.S. government efforts to combat trafficking in the twelve years following implementation of the VTVPA. I expand my analysis beyond T-visa distribution data to incorporate interviews with high-level government officials, an NGO Director and the Attorney General's Annual Report to Congress and Assessment of U.S. Government Activities to Combat Trafficking in Persons Report. While policies to combat trafficking are strong, there is a gap with regard to implementation. I argue that collaboration between the government and NGOs is the key to providing the most comprehensive services to the greatest number of trafficking victims.

Rights

In Copyright. URI: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/ This Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).

DOI

10.25777/5avr-hk97

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