Date of Award

Fall 2019

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Human Movement Sciences

Committee Director

Edward L. Hill

Committee Director

Shana Pribesh

Committee Member

Stephen Shapiro

Committee Member

Ronald Ramsing

Committee Member

Kent Reifschneider

Abstract

From toddlers to adolescents, poor medical regimen and adherence occurs as youth face adversities caused by type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). This inquiry-based research sought to explore the process of promoting resilience to attain personal diabetes management through outcome-focused programming. This dissertation was structured in a three-paper format to highlight three sectors of a medical specialty camp to identify the significance of building resilience among youth with T1DM, incorporating family support, and providing service-learning opportunities for students. The purpose of this study was to examine the impacts associated with campers’ resilience from pre- to post-camp based on their participation in an outcome-focused medical specialty camp by using the Resiliency and Attitude Skills Profile-Modified and the American Camp Association’s Youth Outcome Battery (ACA-YOB) Measure. Campers were able to self-report on their outcomes based on their involvement in camp (e.g., participating in recreationally engineered experiences). The second paper utilized both quantitative and qualitative data to explore the impact of integrating families into the camp experience to understand the parent perspectives by using the Resiliency and Attitude Skills Profile-Modified: Parent Version, the American Camp Association’s Youth Outcome Battery (ACA-YOB) Parent Perceptions Measure, and open-ended questions. Parents were able to self-report their perception of their child’s outcomes based on their involvement in camp (e.g., attending parent sessions and participating in outcome-focused recreational programming). The third and final paper also used a mixed methods approach to explore the impact of service-learning, in a medical specialty camp, on University students’ perspectives. The researchers used service-learning evaluations and the ACA-YOB Staff Perceptions Measure tool to explore the student counselors’ experience. Student counselors also self-reported their outcomes, based on their involvement, as it related to five constructs (e.g., professional skills) focused around service-learning.

DOI

10.25777/a7bd-0c36

ORCID

/0000-0003-3889-5295

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