Title

Olivia Gude’s Deck of Cards [Art Education]

Faculty Advisor

Natalia Pilato

Presentation Type

Artwork

Disciplines

Art Education

Description/Abstract

Artist Statement

Olivia Gude’s Deck of Cards project aims to force the maker to take what cards they are given and to create a message from them. The cards are worked on by other members participating in the project; each person adds a single image throughout each rotation of the cards. By the end of the cycle, the cards are generally halfway covered, but their numbers and symbols are visible. The numbers and symbols should be used by the maker as a part of the message that is being conveyed. The maker can then take any medium to cover up or highlight the group’s contributions in order to communicate their concepts.

These specific cards focus on Olivia Gude’s post-modern principles of art education. These cards symbolize Playing, Forming Self, Investigating Community, Reconstructing Social Spaces, Deconstructing Culture, Attentive Living, and Empowered Making. Each card is labeled with the concept it is guided by. By Playing, Olivia Gude means to experiment with mediums before students take on the problem solving and communicating aspects of an artwork. Forming Self puts the student into the artwork, or gives the student an opportunity to express her or himself. I chose to use the King of spades card for this concept. Initially, it had a lot of random clippings from magazines, but I chose to emphasize the humorous images to put myself in the art work. I then chose to layer paper and cotton balls to create a mountain landscape-something I find extremely calming, and was able to cover up any extraneous images. Investigating Community focuses on artwork and projects that are central to the students in your classroom. Reconstructing Social Spaces attends to the idea of creating a space that is open and conducive to creativity and expression. Deconstructing Culture questions how students’ thoughts and desires are shaped through local and global visual culture. This principle is expressed through the 2 of hearts card. This card had many sexual images on it, and I decided to put blue pastel over most of the images, representing a dead computer screen. I also chose to put wire over top of the card, conveying the idea that our current culture is very much confined by technology and sexual imagery. Attentive Living aims to have the students pay attention to the world around them, and vitally experiencing everyday life. Empowered Making challenges students to construct, select, and present specific and important visual images. Each of these cards uses yarn or pastels or wire to emphasize specific images that I think help most direct the viewer into understanding the labels under the cards.

This project was quite difficult, as the cards were very random and had almost no purpose or thought behind their composition. Being able to transform them into expressing principles of art education, even with sexual or humorous images on almost every single card, was a very tough problem-solving lesson.

Session Title

Art Exhibit

Location

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Northeast Atrium

Start Date

3-2-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

3-2-2018 12:30 PM

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Feb 3rd, 8:00 AM Feb 3rd, 12:30 PM

Olivia Gude’s Deck of Cards [Art Education]

Learning Commons @ Perry Library, Northeast Atrium

Artist Statement

Olivia Gude’s Deck of Cards project aims to force the maker to take what cards they are given and to create a message from them. The cards are worked on by other members participating in the project; each person adds a single image throughout each rotation of the cards. By the end of the cycle, the cards are generally halfway covered, but their numbers and symbols are visible. The numbers and symbols should be used by the maker as a part of the message that is being conveyed. The maker can then take any medium to cover up or highlight the group’s contributions in order to communicate their concepts.

These specific cards focus on Olivia Gude’s post-modern principles of art education. These cards symbolize Playing, Forming Self, Investigating Community, Reconstructing Social Spaces, Deconstructing Culture, Attentive Living, and Empowered Making. Each card is labeled with the concept it is guided by. By Playing, Olivia Gude means to experiment with mediums before students take on the problem solving and communicating aspects of an artwork. Forming Self puts the student into the artwork, or gives the student an opportunity to express her or himself. I chose to use the King of spades card for this concept. Initially, it had a lot of random clippings from magazines, but I chose to emphasize the humorous images to put myself in the art work. I then chose to layer paper and cotton balls to create a mountain landscape-something I find extremely calming, and was able to cover up any extraneous images. Investigating Community focuses on artwork and projects that are central to the students in your classroom. Reconstructing Social Spaces attends to the idea of creating a space that is open and conducive to creativity and expression. Deconstructing Culture questions how students’ thoughts and desires are shaped through local and global visual culture. This principle is expressed through the 2 of hearts card. This card had many sexual images on it, and I decided to put blue pastel over most of the images, representing a dead computer screen. I also chose to put wire over top of the card, conveying the idea that our current culture is very much confined by technology and sexual imagery. Attentive Living aims to have the students pay attention to the world around them, and vitally experiencing everyday life. Empowered Making challenges students to construct, select, and present specific and important visual images. Each of these cards uses yarn or pastels or wire to emphasize specific images that I think help most direct the viewer into understanding the labels under the cards.

This project was quite difficult, as the cards were very random and had almost no purpose or thought behind their composition. Being able to transform them into expressing principles of art education, even with sexual or humorous images on almost every single card, was a very tough problem-solving lesson.