Title

Effects of Ginger on Performance and Perceptual Responses to Maximal Sprint Cycling

Description/Abstract

Historically, ginger has been used as a nausea and pain remedy by many societies. This research study is seeking to discover the effects of ingesting ginger before a 30-second Wingate, a cycling test that can induce both nausea and leg pain/discomfort. This study is employing a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design. For the protocol, participants complete a Wingate familiarization at an initial visit. Then, they complete additional Wingate tests at two subsequent visits. They are given a standardized meal (e.g. Clif bar) that is consumed three hours before testing. Supplements are taken one hour prior to testing. During the Wingate tests, participants do a 5-minute warm-up. After briefly resting, they gradually rise up to 90 RPM over a 30-second run-in period. At the end of this run-in period, a torque factor equal to 0.8 N∙m/kg of body mass is applied as a braking force, and participants cycle maximally for 30 seconds. Afterward, there is a 5-minute cool-down. To assess nausea, a 0-10-point scale is being used, 0 being ‘none’ and 10 being ‘extreme’ nausea. The subjective intensity of the exercise is being measured with the rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale (0 = ‘nothing at all’, 10 = ‘very, very hard’), while leg pain is being assessed with a similar scale (0 = ‘no pain at all’, 10 = ‘extremely intense pain’). To evaluate performance, peak power, mean power, and RPM are recorded for each test. Differences between the conditions will be made with paired t-tests and/or Mann-Whitney U tests.

Presenting Author Name/s

Lauren White

Faculty Advisor

Patrick Wilson

Presentation Type

Poster

Disciplines

Other Chemicals and Drugs | Sports Sciences

Session Title

Poster Session

Location

Learning Commons, Atrium

Start Date

2-8-2020 8:00 AM

End Date

2-8-2020 12:30 PM

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Feb 8th, 8:00 AM Feb 8th, 12:30 PM

Effects of Ginger on Performance and Perceptual Responses to Maximal Sprint Cycling

Learning Commons, Atrium

Historically, ginger has been used as a nausea and pain remedy by many societies. This research study is seeking to discover the effects of ingesting ginger before a 30-second Wingate, a cycling test that can induce both nausea and leg pain/discomfort. This study is employing a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design. For the protocol, participants complete a Wingate familiarization at an initial visit. Then, they complete additional Wingate tests at two subsequent visits. They are given a standardized meal (e.g. Clif bar) that is consumed three hours before testing. Supplements are taken one hour prior to testing. During the Wingate tests, participants do a 5-minute warm-up. After briefly resting, they gradually rise up to 90 RPM over a 30-second run-in period. At the end of this run-in period, a torque factor equal to 0.8 N∙m/kg of body mass is applied as a braking force, and participants cycle maximally for 30 seconds. Afterward, there is a 5-minute cool-down. To assess nausea, a 0-10-point scale is being used, 0 being ‘none’ and 10 being ‘extreme’ nausea. The subjective intensity of the exercise is being measured with the rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale (0 = ‘nothing at all’, 10 = ‘very, very hard’), while leg pain is being assessed with a similar scale (0 = ‘no pain at all’, 10 = ‘extremely intense pain’). To evaluate performance, peak power, mean power, and RPM are recorded for each test. Differences between the conditions will be made with paired t-tests and/or Mann-Whitney U tests.