Presentations

Event Title

Prevalence of HIV Infection for Black Women

Date

April 2021

Location

Online

Description

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a communicable disease that affects thousands of people every day. The treatment has advanced over the years, decreasing mortality. However, there is evidence of disparities in contraction rates for certain groups (Bradley, Geter, Lima, Sutton, & Mccree, 2018). Black women have the highest rate of infection and one of the lowest rates for access to care in comparison to other races. In 2016, 61% of HIV diagnoses were from black women. This is a significantly disproportionate number due to the fact that black women only make up 13% of the U.S. female population (Bradley, Geter, Lima, Sutton, & Mccree, 2018). Recent studies indicate that 1 in 54 black women will contract HIV in comparison to 1 in 941 white women. In the article, Effectively Addressing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disparities Affecting US Black Women the authors identified three factors that significantly contributed to the racial disparities in infection rates for women; inequitable access to care, racism, and the prevalence of infections in the black community (Bradley, Geter, Lima, Sutton, & Mccree, 2018). In order to address these social determinants, appropriate studies need to be conducted that places the focus on black women.

Presentation Type

Presentation

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Prevalence of HIV Infection for Black Women

Online

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a communicable disease that affects thousands of people every day. The treatment has advanced over the years, decreasing mortality. However, there is evidence of disparities in contraction rates for certain groups (Bradley, Geter, Lima, Sutton, & Mccree, 2018). Black women have the highest rate of infection and one of the lowest rates for access to care in comparison to other races. In 2016, 61% of HIV diagnoses were from black women. This is a significantly disproportionate number due to the fact that black women only make up 13% of the U.S. female population (Bradley, Geter, Lima, Sutton, & Mccree, 2018). Recent studies indicate that 1 in 54 black women will contract HIV in comparison to 1 in 941 white women. In the article, Effectively Addressing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disparities Affecting US Black Women the authors identified three factors that significantly contributed to the racial disparities in infection rates for women; inequitable access to care, racism, and the prevalence of infections in the black community (Bradley, Geter, Lima, Sutton, & Mccree, 2018). In order to address these social determinants, appropriate studies need to be conducted that places the focus on black women.